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World Food Programme Lists African Countries To Go Hungry Soon

Sudanese displaced woman line up to receive food at Kasab Internally Displaced People's camp near Kutum, Northern Darfur, Sudan in this July 2004 file picture.The European Union has threatened Sudan with "imminent" U.N. sanctions if it does not end the conflict in its western Darfur region that has killed tens of thousands, but Sudan said the threats would only damage peace efforts.(AP Photo/Marcus Prior/WFP)
Sudanese displaced woman line up to receive food at Kasab Internally Displaced People’s camp near Kutum, Northern Darfur, Sudan in this July 2004 file picture.The European Union has threatened Sudan with “imminent” U.N. sanctions if it does not end the conflict in its western Darfur region that has killed tens of thousands, but Sudan said the threats would only damage peace efforts.(AP Photo/Marcus Prior/WFP)
Due to the current climate change, the United Nations World Food Programme has allegedly speculated that some African countries may soon begin to face hunger.
The speculation was based a research carried out by the WFP which revealed that about 14 million people are facing hunger in southern Africa because of a drought that’s been made worse by the El Nino weather pattern.
The WFP says Malawi is the worst-affected country where 2.8 million people or 16% of the population are expected to go hungry, followed by Madagascar and Zimbabwe.
“With little or no rain falling in many areas and the window for the planting of cereals closing fast or already closed in some countries, the outlook is alarming,” it added.
El Niño is defined as prolonged warming in the Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures when compared with the average value. The U.S National Ocean and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) defines as a 3-month average warming of at least 0.5 °C (0.9 °F) in a specific area of the east-central tropical Pacific Ocean.
When El Niño conditions last for many months, extensive ocean warming and the reduction in easterly trade winds limits up-welling of cold nutrient-rich deep water, and its economic impact to local fishing for an international market can be serious

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